06 January 2014

Pattern Puzzle - Twist Drape Shift

It's hard to imagine how this strange shape will make-up when you first see the puzzle.  It is a slightly complex style that I managed to cut after working through the detail in a couple of stages.  Our fans were quick to work this one out on the weekend as they are all familiar with the variety of twist techniques that we use at Studio Faro.



This style is a self lined dress that has a combination of extra drape that works into a full garment twist, most likely made in a jersey fabric.  
It is a twist we have seen before in the Nejiri Twist #PatternPuzzle.



The first stage in the patten making is to push the side seams in the same way as 'Pattern Magic' by Tomoko Nakamichi p.72.  By doing this we use the slightly twisted grain in the pattern to make the twist in our dress.  Below is the pattern plan based on a knit block with twisted seams.  The dotted lines are marked in to open up for the extra drape and tucks in the next phase.  Also included is a boat neckline and cap sleeve.



Working the twisted patterns (front and back) onto a fold at the hemline is what holds our twist in place in the garment.  So if we were to make this dress as you see it at this stage, we would have a simple twisted shift.


However we have decided to make it more interesting by including some tucks and drape, working from the front left shoulder around to the back right hip.  Both front and back patterns have been opened up along the dotted lines to include loads of extra fabric for the drape.


And finally we would like to bring these two pieces together to make a one-piece pattern for his style.  A slightly risky move but it may pay off in the final garment.  Not sure what effect the one-piece pattern may have on your width of fabric?  Start with a jersey fabric with a minimum 150cm wide and perhaps mess with the grain to keep it as one piece?  As I said slightly risky.  ;)


Are you up for an adventure?  This slightly untidy looking style is in fact quite a precise piece of pattern making.  Let me know if you have any questions about this puzzle or any of the others on this blog.


19 comments:

  1. Really interesting twist! I've never tried Tomoko Nakamichi's technique but you make it look like something perfectly do-able!
    Is it intended only for lycra knits or a plain jersey could be good?
    MammaNene @ SergerPepper.com

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    1. Thanks so much. Yes I think jersey would be fine. Probably best if you make sure there is lots of extra fabric for twist and a loose fit block. Let me know how it goes. Happy to answer questions. 😄

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  2. i really love your lessons. thank you for sharing so generously.

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  3. This looks like a really fun toga style dress. I would love to try this.

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  4. Thx so much. :) Do you have a knit block you can use to try this style?

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    1. I don't have a block per se but I have a basic moderate stretch knit pattern that I have tweaked for my body. Is this for a moderate stretch or a more stretchy knit? Thanks.

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    2. If the pattern you have has most of the block features (front and back with neckline at base of neck and set in long sleeve) then I think it will work. This style would need a looser fit rather than a body-con tight fit to achieve the soft drape of the style.
      Are you able to post a photo of the pattern here?

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    3. Yes I have posted the line drawings of the envelope (front and back) on my blog post:
      http://lovenicky-froufrou.blogspot.ca/2014/02/pattern-review-my-red-lace-valentines.html
      It has a centre back seam so I guess I wouldn't work so well. What would you suggest? Thanks!

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  5. I think the shape looks good in the red lace as a relaxed fit knit block. It looks like there is a version with a high neck, close to the base of your neck. This is always good for a block.

    I recommend you remove the seam allowances and convert the back seam into a straight fold line. This gives you a blank canvas to work out new styles and you will add the seam allowances back when your pattern is complete. Mark in your natural waist and hip levels on this new block shape. They are useful when you are planning new styles.

    Strongly recommend you toile the block fit before making any new styles. Happy to view and comment on anything you post in your blog. :)

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    1. Thanks for your reply. Just wondering how to eliminate the centre back seam if it's curved seam? It actually curves around my back and then into the waist and then out again on my behind. If I just eliminate it, wouldn't it affect the overall fit? Should I somehow alter the side seams as well if I was to eliminate the centre back seam? Thanks again!

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    2. Yes you will need to compensate at the side seams if you eliminate CB shaping. If you draw a straight line along the centre back (to be your fold line) and work out how much waist shaping you have. Then take this amount off both front and back side seams you will have a very similar fit. By all means keep a copy of the block with CB seam as this can be useful in many styles. :)

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    3. Thanks so much for your advice!

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  7. какая вы хорошая-вы спасаете от дипрессии-вы-прелесть-можно ли мне что-то для вас сделать-так хочется что-нибудь вам сделать-а-

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