14 July 2014

Pattern Puzzle - Drape Collar Extension

Saturday was fun with loads of great answers in our #PatternPuzzle.  The final piece of the puzzle was the 'long pointy thing' that had nearly everyone stumped.  The grown-on band collar is an extension of the front drape in this bias cut top.


Using a fitted block for woven fabric, the pattern plan below has all the style lines needed for this complex top. 

  1.  Working with a 'V' neckline, plan the asymmetric drape, connecting the hemline to the neckline.  
  2. Mark in the connecting lines to the bust point and darts (bust line, waist and near hemline).  
  3. This is where you will open up the pattern to eliminate darts and introduce extra fabric for drape.
  4. For the cap sleeve, keep it short and shaped with the gape darts to tighten up the sleeve opening.

  1. Cut along the connecting lines for the front right and left and tape all the darts closed.
  2. Open up along the cut lines to include more fabric for the ruching in the drape.

  1. Connect the right and left front sections to the asymmetric drape at the hemline.
  2. Extend the drape  to include the back and right side collar.
  3. Join the folded collar back to the front sections of the pattern.
  4. The end of the collar, where it connects with the CF 'V' neck can be tapered (as my example) or square cut.

For the final front pattern mark in the grainline to place the bias on the ruching and drape.


The back has a shaped CB seam and a small adjustment to the neckline to match the front. If you cut the back on the bias you may not need a zipper depending on fabric and fit.  Shape the cap sleeve with gape darts to tighten the sleeve opening.


Let us know what you think, we love to hear from all our fans.
Enjoy



11 comments:

  1. I stumbled upon your blog a little while ago, have lurked for a bit, and now just want to say thank you for all your fascinating posts and puzzles. I really look forward to Monday mornings when I get one in my inbox. Your blog is terrific. I have signed up for a pattern drafting course in the fall and hope to try out some of your puzzles on myself. So thank you again. And your Pinterest boards are pretty luscious too !

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    1. Wow, you have such a beautiful way with words. I am hugely flattered and would love to see your creations as you go through your training. :) Do you mind if I share your comment with my fans?

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    2. Absolutely. And thank you .

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  2. Anita, it would be very rude if I told you what that pattern piece looks like! Very adrift from my sewing and drafting but I'll catch up with you soon.

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    1. Thx Gail. Now that visual is stuck in my head. :/ Looking forward to catching up soon.

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  3. you have demystified pattern making ,,, Thanks so much I look forward to you puzzles

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  4. That pattern piece looks like a goose flying to me....what do you see? ;)
    These patterns are endlessly fascinating!

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    1. I love the weird shapes these patterns make. Thx for dropping by. :)

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  5. Jacqui Thomson25 July, 2014 23:59

    This is the kind of shape my Design Director used to give me to work out (I was a 1st pattern cutter/technician back in my work life). I used to love them and would usually start something like this about 30 minutes before I went home, so that I could 'sleep' on it. By morning I would be able to go in and bash out a pattern for the sample room. Oh, I loved that job!!

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    1. Hi Jacqui, it's great to hear from someone who has the same passion for complex patterns as I do. Please come and join us on the facebook page on Saturday morning when we have the #PatternPuzzles. You'll love them. And if you have any great styles that would make good puzzles we'd love to see them.

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